Hainault Forest Website

Tree identification

Turkey oak  Quercus cerris

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Buds alternate covered with long twisting whiskers

Turkey oak bole. Pale mauvish-grey bark with deep fissures. Leaves feel rough to the touch. Rounded lobes come to a point Mossy cup surrounds the acorn. The cup is unstalked. The acorn takes two years to mature.

RED OAK  Quercus rubra found near  the heathland. Leaf deeply lobed with pointed tips

HOLM OAK Quercus ilex leaves. The leaves are shiny with the underside covered in grey felt. Acorns of Holm oak ripen in one season. Holm oak is an evergreen tree found in the Country Park near the second car park and also in Hainault Lodge Nature Reserve

 

TURKEY OAK Quercus cerris

 

The Turkey oak was introduced into parks in the UK in early eighteenth century particularly in Southern Britain and is therefore a recent newcomer compared to the English or Pedunculate oak which has been present  for over 5,000 years. It is regarded by some as a weed or pest species as it is fast growing and will hybridise with the English oak. In many Nature Reserves and woodlands it is removed. It is a graceful tree and can be recognised in the winter by the long twisting whiskers surrounding the buds on its twigs. The acorns, which are surrounded by a mossy cup, take two years to mature compared to the English oak which ripen in one season. There are several mature trees in the Country Park and in the woodland area, and also some smaller scrub. The leaves feel rough to the touch and the lobes are pointed. There is a small stalk.

There are two Holm oaks Quercus ilex near the second car park in the Country Park and a magnificent tree in the Hainault Lodge Local Nature Reserve. It is an evergreen oak. There is only one example of the Red Oak Q. rubra so named from its leaves which turn red in the autumn and this tree is in the woodland bordering the northern end of the Heathland area.

TURKEY OAK Quercus cerris. Branches retain some of their old leaves well into winter. Found throughout the forest. This stands near the Foxburrows Road entrance.

HOLM OAK Quercus ilex  An evergreen oak photographed in February. By the corner of the second car park, Foxburrows Road.