Hainault Forest Website

Tree identification

Ash Fraxinus excelsior

HOME PAGE  ALDER  ASH  ASPEN  BEECH  BIRD CHERRY  BLACK POPLAR  BLACKTHORN  CONIFERS  CRAB APPLE  DOGWOOD  ELDER   ELM  ENGLISH OAK  FALSE ACACIA  FIELD MAPLE  HAWTHORN  HAZEL  HOLLY  HORNBEAM  HORSE CHESTNUT  LONDON PLANE  LIME  MULBERRY

PURGING BUCKTHORN  ROWAN  SILVER BIRCH  SPINDLE  SWEET CHESTNUT  TURKEY OAK  WHITE WILLOW  WILD SERVICE

Ash twig. Note the black buds

Ash buds just opening. 11th March 2012

Ash bole. Notice the light grey fissured bark

Ash buds bursting.

Flowers appear before the leaves

New leaves and developing fruits

ASH Fraxinus excelsior

Ash is a common tree in the forest especially in the area between Roe's Well and Sheepwater where it grows well on the sticky boulder clay or glacial till. This is a clay which covers much of north-west Essex with Hainault Forest as its southernmost limit, having been deposited here by the anglian glaciation which travelled southwards over the county some 450,000 years ago. Mature trees of considerable height and girth are found as well as some younger  trees and saplings. Along  the edge of the plantation by the Romford Road can be found One-leaved ash and Single-leaved ash, planted by the GLC and some mature ones can be found planted in New North Road. A variety of Ash - the Weeping Ash can be seen on the edge of the second car park in Foxburrows Road alongside a notice board.

Compound pinnate leaf of Ash.  9-13 leaflets.

Ash fruits known as "keys"

ONE LEAVED ASH

Fraxinus excelsior 'Diversifolia'

In the plantation

SINGLE-LEAVED ASH

Fraxinus angustifolia 'Veltheimii'

In the plantation.

Ash tree in winter from path at the back of Sunnymede

WEEPING ASH Fraxinus excelsior  'pendula' at the corner of the second car park in the Country Park.